• Running 496 miles in March for dementia – Matt Armstrong

Running 496 miles in March for dementia – Matt Armstrong

Borrowed from the Trail Running magazine –

Ambassador Matt Armstrong is sailing through his #Run1000Miles challenge

Over the last month I have been running for Dementia UK, having taken on the #dementia496 challenge – running one mile on March 1, two miles on March 2 and so on until it reached 31 miles on March 31 for an accumulated total of 496 miles. I actually ended up running 549.8 miles with 50,586ft of ascent.

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I have been exploring the trails, taking turns I never have before just to find an extra 0.25 miles. It has been a lot of fun and very challenging, but rewarding as well as I knew I was doing it with purpose.

Running means time, and making it during the day is not always easy, but you have to become inventive to get your miles in. I had a couple of shopping trips wearing a backpack. I thought this challenge would help me get up early before work, but that didn’t work so well – I went for sleep and recovery instead!

On a couple of days I decided to do hill rep days. On days four and ten friends from my running club, Hyde Park Harriers in Leeds, joined me for the respective distance of hill reps, which were a lot of fun but hard work. On other days, I just put in the miles, not always feeling great, but it is surprising how when you keep going things can turn around even on the same run, or on the next run. You have just got to keep moving and focus on the end goal.

I must admit that when I completed the challenge I gave myself a ‘Whoop!’ and fist-pump as there was no one around on a wet and rainy Saturday on a canal towpath. Celebrate your  achievements and the goals you have set yourself.

Doing the #Run1000miles 2018 is a challenge and everybody involved will be doing it their own way, but it is certainly worth finding your reason to run and making each mile count as every mile is an achievement towards your end goal. Maybe try adding an extra 0.25 or more miles to an out-and-back route that you do regularly and start to increase the distance, especially as the evenings are getting lighter now and you can surprise yourself with how far you can go.

Matt Armstrong

http://integralrunning.blogspot.co.uk/

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